NGC 5128 (Centaurus A, Caldwell 77, Arp 153)

Telescope: Planewave 27" CDK reflector, 4638 mm FL
Camera: SBIG STX-9000, 3056 x 3056 pixels
Exposure: 50 minutes. Processed with PixInsight and Photoshop.
Location: Siding Springs Observatory, Australia (Elevation 3720')
Image Center (J2000): RA 13h 25m 30s, Dec -43° 00' 52"

One of the strangest of the nearby galaxies. Centaurus A has the shape of an elliptical galaxy but has a dust lane typical of spiral galaxies. Its exact type is uncertain. The galaxy is likely the result of a collision. Included in Halton Arp's Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies. Many globular clusters are visible. The galaxy’s name, Centaurus A, was designated in 1949 and comes from radio astronomy where radio sources are named with letters with A designating the strongest radio source found within a given constellation. Image noise reduction was minimized near the warped dust lane to keep its details sharp.


NGC 5128 (Centaurus A, Caldwell 77, Arp 153), One of the strangest of the nearby galaxies. Centaurus A has the shape of an elliptical galaxy but has a dust lane typical of spiral galaxies. Its exact type is uncertain. The galaxy is likely the result of a collision. Included in Halton Arp's Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies. Many globular clusters are visible. The galaxy’s name, Centaurus A, was designated in 1949 and comes from radio astronomy where radio sources are named with letters with A designating the strongest radio source found within a given constellation. Image noise reduction was minimized near the warped dust lane to keep its details sharp., acquired with a remote telescope at Siding Springs Observatory, Australia (Elevation 3720')

Object Label Identifier Notes
Globular Cluster GC [HGH2004] 201.52664-43.01059 Globular Cluster, mV=19.43
Globular Cluster GC 39 [R2001b] f1.GC-39 Globular Cluster, mV=17.01
Globular Cluster GC447 [WHB2007] GC0447 Globular Cluster

Click on the image to display the plate solved image with annotations. 5' across NGC 5128 is about 19,000 light years.